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What is Resistance? (Part 4)

Submitted by on Tuesday, 21 October 2014

Resistence to changeThere is a universally believed concept that resistance is ubiquitous, that any change, any new idea, will engender resistance. University programs teach it, Harvard professors such as Chris Argyris have made their reputations and written books on it, consultants make their livings managing it. Yet there is absolutely no reason for there to ever be resistance.

Let’s start with the underlying issue: systems. Everyone lives in, works in, a system of people, rules, relationships, expectations, history. Every system is unique and self-replicating. Everything that exists in a system has it’s place – a place that keeps the system functioning as it’s functioning, regardless of how impractical or non-efficient it is. Systems just are. When anything new attempts to enter a system, a system defends itself and resists – hence, we always define and create our own resistance.
There is a way to avoid resistance by beginning a change or acceptance process by first facilitating the system to re-think, re-organize, re-consider it’s rules, relationships, and expectations so the system itself decides it wants to change based on re-ordering its beliefs and values. Inside-out instead of outside-in. Listen to this podcast where I discuss this. And, if you ever want to learn how to avoid resistance with buyers or coaching clients or change implementations, take a look at my generic Buying Facilitation® model. The sole function of Buying Facilitation® is to facilitate systemic change from the inside out.

I’ve developed a decision facilitation model (called Buying Facilitation® – a change facilitation model, not a sales model) that enables real, lasting change from the inside-out.Call or e-mail with questions.

To learn more about how buyers buy or Buying Facilitation® visit http://www.buyingfacilitation.com/#books.

To hire Sharon Drew as a speaker at your conferences, go tohttp://www.buyingfacilitation.com/#keynotes.