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Why Choose the Earth?

Submitted by on Thursday, 22 April 2010

For the past 40 years, a debate has been ‘raging’ about the earth, the environment, and all things ‘green.’ Is there a problem? What is the evidence? What is my part? Can one person make a difference? Is there a market for ‘green’ and can I make money from it? How would I have to change? What do I have to ‘give up’ to make a difference?

As a liberal and ‘friend of the earth,’ I’d like to pose a few Facilitative Questions to help you think through your positions in the debate.

1. How would you know that doing your personal share to take responsible action (i.e. recycle, watch water usage, use glass water bottles, choose ‘friendly’ products) would make a difference? I’ve heard many folks say that since they are only one person, any activity wouldn’t make a difference.

2. What would you need to know or believe differently to be willing to assume that there are activities you do daily that could either harm or help heal the Earth, and that you can choose to make a difference in a way that wouldn’t effect the outcomes for you personally? For those who don’t think that there is such a thing as Global Warming, there might be things you have choices around that wouldn’t make a difference to your life and would be a potential positive for the Earth, just in case there is validity to the argument. Here is a site that will offer options.

3. What would you need to know to recognize the profit potential in caring for the Earth and be willing to test or try? How would you know that adding environmentally-friendly choices within your workspace, or adding some ‘green’ choices as solutions for clients, would put money in your pocket? For some, unless the ‘green’ choices convert to profit, there is little interest.

Net net, there is a debate about ‘truth’ in this area. While I have a bias, I hope I’ve made it possible for you to think about making new decisions in your life that would be simple to administer and just might mean a whole lot for our planet. Just in case there is validity, and you can do simple things – one person, one company, one family at a time – that wouldn’t mean a huge change or discomfort, but might help save the Earth. Just in case the world needs help.

And thank you.

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  • rcauvin

    For me, I needed to know that what I do is more than just tinkering around the edges and also benefits me personally. Researching urban issues and city planning, I learned the impacts of recycling and many other popular “green” personal choices pale in comparison to the impact of automobile use. Accordingly, among the most important choices are:

    1. Where I choose to live. I choose to live in a walkable neighborhood (downtown Austin) where I can accomplish virtually all day-to-day living (getting groceries, going to the bank, going to the vet, attending civic meetings, going out to eat and drink, getting a hair cut, etc.) by walking, riding my bike, and taking public transportation.
    2. Where I choose to work. I choose to work in a location reachable without getting in my car.
    3. What events I choose to attend. For me, straying far from downtown is like traveling to another city. I only do it occasionally.

    Furthermore, these choices benefit me in many ways. I no longer have to deal with the frustrations of traffic every time I get behind the wheel. I also get to be productive (work, read/write e-mail, read a book) while I ride the bus. My time in an automobile is completely wasted.

    • http://newsalesparadigm.com Sharon Drew Morgen

      you rock, roger

  • rcauvin

    For me, I needed to know that what I do is more than just tinkering around the edges and also benefits me personally. Researching urban issues and city planning, I learned the impacts of recycling and many other popular “green” personal choices pale in comparison to the impact of automobile use. Accordingly, among the most important choices are:

    1. Where I choose to live. I choose to live in a walkable neighborhood (downtown Austin) where I can accomplish virtually all day-to-day living (getting groceries, going to the bank, going to the vet, attending civic meetings, going out to eat and drink, getting a hair cut, etc.) by walking, riding my bike, and taking public transportation.
    2. Where I choose to work. I choose to work in a location reachable without getting in my car.
    3. What events I choose to attend. For me, straying far from downtown is like traveling to another city. I only do it occasionally.

    Furthermore, these choices benefit me in many ways. I no longer have to deal with the frustrations of traffic every time I get behind the wheel. I also get to be productive (work, read/write e-mail, read a book) while I ride the bus. My time in an automobile is completely wasted.